How to Write a Research Paper with Sample Research Papers

5 page research paper on the great depression

C's may get degrees, but only an A+ essay earns a place on your grandmother's fridge or your own fridge. Have you been busting your little collegiate butt just to get mediocre results? Well, tell Granny to get the magnets ready: follow these steps, and take your term papers to the head of the class. Italiano: Español: Português:

How to Write a Last Minute Research Paper 7 Steps

Русский: Deutsch: Français: 中文: Bahasa Indonesia: Nederlands: Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 6,576,569 times.

If you're anything like me, you always have good intentions at the beginning of the semester for giving yourself ample time to complete your research paper. But then the weekend (or night) before the paper's due date sneaks up on you and you haven't even started. This situation has happened to me countless times - in fact, I can't remember ever starting a paper earlier than 7 days before the due date. I have had many years to perfect my procrastination methodology and I think I've got it down to a science. This guide is for quick and dirty paper writing - it probably contradicts everything your teachers have told you. But it works. The best scenario for writing a quick paper is when your professor allows you to pick your topic / thesis statement.

How to Write a Research Paper A Research Guide for Students

Note: This is not the time to develop your thesis. That comes later. The key is to pick as broad a topic as possible. If your professor wants a 65 page paper it will be much easier to fill 65 pages about the life of Aristotle than having to create a bunch of fluff around his views on posterior analytics. Also, pick a topic that a lot of previous research has already been done on it. If you're writing the paper the day before it's due, you aren't trying to reinvent the wheel.

You're basically just collaging other people's research and putting it in your own words. Now that you've done the research, you should have an idea as to what your thesis statement should be. Professors always hate broad thesis statements so try to make it seem as specific as you can without limiting the amount of things you can talk about. Since this is a research paper it doesn't have to be controversial, revolutionary, super innovative, etc. It just needs to provide direction on where your paper is going. So if you are writing about a person you can talk about how they were influential, made an impact on issues of that time period, thrived through difficult circumstances, something like that. A general rule I learned in high school is that thesis statements should be the last sentence of the introductory paragraph.

I've always put it there and haven't had a teacher correct me so I would go with that. Once you have your thesis statement established, read through the stuff you have written and try to organize and take out stuff that doesn't fit. Come up with the number of paragraphs you want, what each paragraph is specifically talking about, and put things in their respective paragraphs. Don't start on the introduction and conclusion paragraphs yet, just dive right into the facts. Try to blend the stuff from different sources so that it all flows together. Different sources can have different tones and writing styles and even though you put everything in your own words, each section can sound different. This puts up a red flag for a professor to think that you are plagiarizing so keep that in mind.

If you need to, google some more stuff and get more research. Don't forget to put in all your citations. for the Works Cited page I always go to citationmachine.