Critical Thinking

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Glossary of Critical Thinking Terms

Taking a Kolbe A Index will help you identify your own natural strengths and talents. Kathy Kolbe discovered the power of conation. She recognized the clear differences between it and intelligence and emotions. Team Collaboration Survey and Team Guidance System™ deliver quick and insightful analysis for anyone who wants to know the best ways to maximize team productivity. Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials. Are you getting the free resources, updates, and special offers we send out every week in our teacher newsletter? Strategic thinking is a process that defines the manner in which people think about, assess, view, and create the future for themselves and others. Strategic thinking is an extremely effective and valuable tool. One can apply strategic thinking to arrive at decisions that can be related to your work or personal life. Strategic thinking involves developing an entire set of critical skills. What are those critical skills? I offer the following list of critical skills that the best strategic thinkers possess and use every day.

Critical Skill #6: Strategic thinkers have the ability to use the left (logical) and right (creative) sides of their brain. This skill takes practice as well as confidence and can be tremendously valuable. Critical Skill #7: They have the ability to develop a clearly defined and focused business vision and personal vision. They are skilled at both thinking with a strategic purpose as well as creating a visioning process. They have both skills and they use them to complement each other. Critical Skill #8: They have the ability to clearly define their objectives and develop a strategic action plan with each objective broken down into tasks and each task having a list of needed resources and a specific timeline. Critical Skill #9: They have the ability to design flexibility into their plans by creating some benchmarks in their thinking to review progress. Then they use those benchmarks to as a guide and to recognize the opportunity to revise their plans as needed. How can students own their learning with critical thinking activities they ll really love?   Allowing our students to take stands on issues that matter to them engages the classroom in a way that fosters great critical thinking. Who? What?

Creativity Thinking Skills Critical Thinking Problem

Why? When? Where? How?  When they can relate these questions to themselves and exercise personal self-reflection, we build community and heart-centered learning. Let’s get to the critical thinking skills that really matter. From, here are some amazing critical thinking activities that you can do with your students. Students pair up according to similar physical attributes determined by the facilitator. These include hair color, eye color, hand size, and height. For each attribute, students discuss times when they were discriminated against because of it. They then take on the roles as victim, perpetrator, or bystander and discuss. When posed with a thought-provoking prompt, students line themselves up along a U-shaped continuum representing where they stand on that issue.

The sides of the U are opposite extremes, with the middle being neutral. The teacher starts a discussion by giving equal opportunity for individuals in each area of the continuum to speak about their stand.  The students use “I” statements when stating their opinion. Writing (or drawing) and silence are used as tools to slow down thinking and allow for silent reflection, unfiltered. By using silence and writing, students can focus on other viewpoints. This activity uses a driving question, markers, and Big Paper (poster-sized is best). Students work in pairs or threes to have a conversation on the Big Paper. Critical thinking is the process of actively analyzing, evaluating, and synthesizing information gathered from a variety of sources, using a framework designed to lend structure and clarity to the thinking process. As children think, they use their background knowledge, as well as information gathered from other sources, to draw their own conclusions. One of the challenges when teaching critical thinking skills to English language learners (ELLs) is helping them develop adequate background knowledge and adequate vocabulary to support this type of higher order thinking. The article Hooked on Thinking by Ann Paziotopoulos and Marianne Kroll, describes critical thinking using a skyscraper analogy. Using a construct based on Bloom's Taxonomy, the authors compare the different layers of critical thinking (see chart below) to the different levels of a building.

The foundation of the building, or the lowest level of critical thinking, would be represented by such tasks as recalling facts from a story. At the second level, students might be expected to give a summary or an explanation of a story. At the third level, students would be expected to relate the story to their own lives. At the fourth level, they would compare and contrast elements within the story. The fifth level would require hypothesizing or creating something new based on the reading. To reach the top of the skyscraper, or the sixth level, students must be able to synthesize the information from the story and then formulate their own opinions. An important element of higher order thinking is learning to ask critical questions. ELLs in particular need assistance in learning how to ask these types of questions that will enhance their understanding (i. E. What if Little Red Riding Hood did not take the long way to Granny's house? What would have happened to her? , etc.

). Teachers can begin this process by pre-teaching vocabulary and helping students build background knowledge prior to reading. This site offers an introduction to different stages of Bloom's Taxonomy theory, as well as methods for applying the theory in lesson plans.