How to write a book the short honest truth Scott Berkun

Every author I know gets asked the same question: How do you write a book? It s a simple question, but it causes unexpected problems. On the one hand, it s nice to have people interested in something I do. If I told people I fixed toasters for a living, I doubt I d get many inquires. People are curious about writing and that s cool and flattering. Rock on. But on the other hand, the hand involving people who ask because they have an inkling to do it themselves, is that writing books is a topic so old and by that anyone who asks hoping to discover secret advice is hard to take seriously. Here s the short honest truth: 75% of the people who ask me are hoping to hear this Anyone can write a book.

They want permission. The truth is you don t need any.

Writing, as opposed to publishing, requires almost no financial or physical resources. A pen, paper and effort are all that has been required for hundreds of years.

If and could write in prison, then you can do it in suburbia, at lunch, at work, or after your kids go to sleep.  You will always find excuses if you want them and you probably do.

If you want to write, kill the magic: a book is just a bunch of writing. Anyone can write a book.

It might suck or be incomprehensible, but so what: it s still a book. Nothing is stopping you right now from collecting all of your elementary school book reports, or drunken napkin scribbles, binding them together at Kinkos for $75, slapping a title on the cover, and qualifying as an author. Want to write a good book? Ok, but get in line since most pro authors are still trying to figure that out too.